Surrogates: What to Expect Following Delivery

When deciding to become a Surrogate and embarking on your Surrogate journey, you are helping make a couple’s dream of parenthood become a reality. The entire surrogacy process is exciting and joyful—especially as you’re sharing the experience with the excited Intended Parents—but what should you expect following your delivery? Although you’re prepared for what to expect during your journey as a Surrogate, it’s important to understand what’s to follow afterward as well. 

Following the delivery, Surrogates may experience several challenges. Despite the fact that you are not bringing the child home following the birth, many people mistakenly believe that Surrogates don’t experience the same post-pregnancy challenges as other women. Keep reading to learn tips and tricks that you can use to prepare yourself and your family for the journey after delivery. 

Communication with the Intended Parents and Child Post-Birth

One of the most popular questions many Surrogates receive following their delivery is: What form of communication will you potentially have with the child and Intended Parents? It’s important to be open and honest in the beginning stages with the Intended Parents about your expectations regarding communication in order to have an established plan following the delivery. As a Surrogate, you should never hesitate to ask any questions you may have regarding the situation. Having open and honest communication is ideal, but it’s critical to have your expectations outlined within your contract. Doing this beforehand will certainly make your transition after pregnancy much easier. Although some Intended Parents prefer to have limited contact following the delivery, it can prove to be beneficial for everyone involved to schedule a visit following the child’s birth. A scheduled visit will help to assure the Surrogate that the baby is progressing, but it will also provide the baby with comfort as well, as they became accustomed to the Surrogate’s voice throughout the pregnancy. Even with an established communication plan, it’s normal to experience mixed emotions when you witness the Intended Parents holding their newborn baby for the rest time. You will experience a sense of relief that the process is complete but it’s common to experience sadness as well. It’s comforting to know you provided the gift of a family to a deserving couple, but it’s also important to allow yourself to work through your feelings and move on to the next chapter. 

Potential Physical Changes to Expect

In addition to the emotional challenges you might experience following your surrogacy journey, it’s important to understand that you will face the same physical challenges from a traditional pregnancy.

Weight Gain

Weight gain during the pregnancy is expected and beneficial, as it demonstrates the baby is developing properly and your body is preparing itself for delivery. While it’s common to lose some weight during and following the delivery, it can take some women approximately nine months before returning to their previous physique. It’s important to speak with your doctor to determine exactly when you can do physical activity or exercise following the delivery. There’s no one specific time frame that fits for everyone, so it is important to speak with your doctor. Even if you’re feeling good and capable of physical activity or exercise, it’s vital to remain cautious. 

Vaginal Area

Traditional pregnancies and deliveries are challenging on a women’s body. On average, it takes approximately four to seven days for this area to heal but it’s common to experience discomfort for six weeks following the delivery. 

Breasts

Throughout the pregnancy, your body will begin to produce milk for the baby. As a Surrogate, it’s unlikely that you will be breastfeeding, unless you are donating your milk, but you will still experience levels of discomfort as your breasts begin to fill with milk that isn’t being emptied. It’s important to speak with your doctor about ways to manage the pain and discomfort until your body stops producing milk. 

Reaction From Your Family and Friends

In addition to the physical and emotional challenges Surrogates experience following the entire surrogacy process and delivery, many former Surrogates report that the reaction from their family and friends played a significant role in their recovery—for better or worse. It’s extremely important and beneficial to the recovery process that you surround yourself with understanding loved ones who acknowledge that you are recovering, both emotionally and physically. 

The decision to embark on a surrogacy journey is extremely important and every piece of information is vital to understanding all aspects that are involved in the process. This post is designed as an early starting point for potential Surrogates to understand the process in its entirety. Regardless of what your decision is to start your surrogacy journey, our specialists are available to discuss your options in complete confidentiality—providing you with comfort and security as we find the perfect solution for you. Contact us today to get started!

 

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