Common Surrogacy Myths Debunked

There is no feeling in the world that can compare to the feeling of holding your child for the first time. Unfortunately, many individuals are not able to conceive on their own. Whether you are in a same-sex relationship, struggle to carry a pregnancy to term, or are coping with you or your partner’s infertility, you may find yourself starting to lose hope in achieving your dreams of parenthood.

Surrogacy Myths

As an intended parent, you’ve probably considered hiring a surrogate to have your child. With that being said, there is no doubt that you’ve heard countless myths in regards to the surrogacy process. Do not let this discourage you. While most individuals know not to accept these rumors at face value, it is important to conduct your own research. We’ve done that for you! Being in the industry for over 15 years, we’re here to provide you with the facts and provide clarification, before you make a decision that will ultimately change your life forever. Keep reading to learn the truth about some of the most common surrogacy myths!

Myth #1: Surrogacy is unethical

This couldn’t be farther from the truth – surrogacy is not unethical. While surrogacy has often been misinterpreted within the media, as a “baby selling” scheme or a “wombs for rent” scenario, this is not the case at all. No exploitation of women takes place in legal surrogacy contracts in the US. In order to qualify as a surrogate mother, women must make sure they can meet a set of standard requirements. One of the requirements is that she must have a stable living condition and be financially secure, meaning she does not require public assistance. Finally, she must then pass a series of psychological and medical screenings. Therefore, agencies cannot simply hire anyone just for intent of making money.

Myth #2: My friend should carry my child for me

Going through the surrogacy process without the aid of an agency does not benefit you or your friend. Without a professional surrogacy agency, intended parents often miss out on the opportunity to properly get matched. At Simple Surrogacy, we take our screening process very seriously. We screen through hundreds of applicants to ensure that we find you the perfect match based on your specific needs. Moreover, not going through an agency prevents both the intended parents and surrogate from receiving background checks, psychological and medical screenings, and support and assistance from industry professionals. Lastly, asking your friend to be your surrogate can lead to many legal issues in the long-run. Without a formal legal surrogacy agreement, you may not be protected in the case something goes wrong.

Myth #3: Surrogates are only doing it for the money

Although surrogates in the US are compensated, surrogacy is not all about the money. It takes a very special women to become a surrogate. These women tend to be selfless, compassionate, and do so with the intent of benefiting others as opposed to themself. They love the idea helping other experience the joys of parenthood. A surrogate goes through all the health risks and bodily changes that a typical woman goes through in the 9 months she is carrying a child. The joy our surrogates get when they let their intended parents hold the baby for the first time is indescribable. These moments are priceless and no monetary amount can suffice these life-altering experiences.

Myth #4: The surrogate may decide to keep my baby

This is the most common fear of IPs when it comes to surrogacy. However, keep in mind that surrogacy contracts are as legally binding as any other legal contact. With that being said, your surrogacy agreement is valid in any court of law where surrogacy is recognized and accepted. It is actually very rare for the surrogate to change her mind and demand to keep the baby once she’s given birth. When you choose to go with a surrogate from an agency, the woman knows beforehand exactly what she is going into, especially if she’s been a surrogate before. At Simple Surrogacy, we require our surrogates to have had a child of their own and therefore must make the decision of becoming a surrogate with the intent of giving up the child after 9 months.

Myth #5: I won’t be able to bond with my baby

Many intended parents fear that they may never bond with the baby. This is a misconception. The bonding process truly begins after the child is born and does not fully take place in the womb.  Despite the fact that you did not carry the baby for 9 months, as an IP, you are involved in the surrogacy process every step of the way. Once the child is born, he or she is handed to the intended parents and from there on a bond will form. It is care, love, attention and nurturance that really form and seal an everlasting bond between you and the baby.

Parenthood is a beautiful thing. Hopefully we have provided you with the answers you need to debunk your fears of surrogacy. If you or someone you know is interested in becoming a parent through surrogacy, visit our website today or call us at 1-866-41-SURRO today.

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